Travel Photography Workshop

Like with traditional photography classes and instruction, a travel photography workshop aims to enhance your skills throughout a specific journey. Its strike contrast relies on the location and how the travel photography workshop gets presented to its participants.
Check out our upcoming Photography tour 2017

Travel Photography WorkshopTravel Photography Workshop - Intensive learning In-situ

I for one like the idea of maximizing the instruction and teaching in just a few days. Research studies have shown that condensing material in a few short segments provides a better comprehension and absorption by the students.

A travel photography workshop works in a similar fashion:
A lot of information is condensed in just a few days, and its main advantage is experienced with the direct access to the instructors and the unique setting.
This is no small thing, since the possibility to incorporate new knowledge, and immediately utilize it on the field helps the learning process tremendously.

Observing Rather than Viewing in a

Travel Photography Workshop

The French microbiologist and chemist Louis Pasteur, known for the invention of Pasteurization, had a very interesting quote:

Fortune Favors the Prepared Mind

While on location, and sometimes due to the cultural distance and ethnology variation of our own culture, our eye and mind can observe things in a different and alternative way.  This is a great thing, but one that can only be advantageous to the "prepared mind" as Pasteur calls it. By developing your skills: understanding of light, composition, field of view, depth of field, perspective, color theory, etc. You can prepare your mind for anything you might encounter.

Traveling to a distant land can be a great opportunity to enhance these skills. The cultural distance and differences can trigger many 'happy discoveries due to the environment.

Weston_ExcusadoTake Edward Weston famous "Excusado" photograph from 1925. Weston took this picture in Mexico, and although the toilet is shown as a massive sculpture, Weston was truly fascinated with its design.
He himself, had never lived in a house with internal pluming while in the USA.

Photography Location – Pucará de Tilcara, Jujuy

Photography locations - Pucará de TilcaraThere are some photography locations that are truly special and photogenic like no other. Perhaps some of its advantages rely on their continuity and lack of change, such as their landscape and climate, which might not vary over many centuries thus preserving its charm and unique characteristics. The following is a photography location like no other.

Photography Location - Pucará de Tilcara

In our photo tour through the Northwestern region of Argentina - Magical Argentina - we'll travel to this incredible photography location: El Pucará de Tilcara. An historical site with vast anthropological and archeological significance, which dates back before the Spanish colonization of America.

Photography Locations - Pucará de TilcaraThe Pucará is a city fortification with pre-Inca origins, strategically located on top of a hill, with rich, majestic views over the surrounding valley and La Quebrada de Humahuaca ( an access route that provided  trade pathways to the Inca empire in the southern region. Currently a UNESCO protected site) This location was strategically chosen due to its access and its superior position against foreign invaders. Its history and constructions makes it a great photography location.

Photography Locations - Pucará de TilcaraTraces of human habitation in the area date back more than 10,000 years. The Inca domination of the area only lasted for about half a century, and ended with the arrival of the Spanish in 1536, who founded the modern town of Tilcara in 1586.

Photography Location for Soda Estereo

During 1985, the Argentinian rock band "Soda Estereo" used this unique photography location as the backdrop for their emblematic single "Cuando Pase el Temblor" (When the tremor subsides).

The contrast of the ancient landscape against the group's Goth/Dark looks, highlighted by singer's Gustavo Cerati aesthetics, produced a truly striking contrast between the electro/reaggea groove with sound patches of northwestern Argentina pan-flute phrases.


The song and its music video not only became an instant hit throughout Latin America, but as a convergence of modern art and ancient history playing together, in search of a new cultural identity.

Join us next December when we visit El Pucará de Tilcara as part of our photography tour excursion through the Norther Region of Argentina. This is a great photography location along our itinerary.